Ongoing Tips

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #84 – SWOT TIME

by psalter on January 1, 2017

What would you like to achieve this year both academically and in your personal life? The start of the year is the perfect time to reflect and reassess. It is a great time to look back and decide what worked, what didn’t and what new approaches you will try.

A great way to do this is through taking a few minutes to do a SWOT analysis. You can either write your answers down or discuss with someone or just think about your responses.

STRENGTHS:

  • What went well for you at school last year?
  • What study and time management techniques worked for you?
  • What skills do you have that help you to do your best at school?

WEAKNESSES:

  • What were your greatest challenges in achieving your personal best at school?
  • What do you struggle with most as a student?
  • What do you need the most help with?

OPPORTUNITIES:

  • What one thing could you do differently this year that would most help you to improve your results?
  • What skills do you most need to focus on improving this year?
  • Who in your life would be able to help you to be a better student?

THREATS:

  • What are the biggest obstacles to you making changes in your approach?
  • Are there other students you sit with who make learning difficult?
  • What is stopping you from achieving the best results you can at school?

After you have worked through the SWOT analysis, choose the top 5 changes you want to make this year and write these down. Put these goals somewhere where you will see them every day before you go to school. If possible also write down some specific actions or steps you could take to achieve these goals. A good way to do this is at the start of each week write down the steps you want to take for that week.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #83 – SCHOOLWORK IN HOLIDAYS?

by psalter on December 1, 2016

The holidays are designed to be a period of rest and recuperation for students. This means that students need a chance to unwind and relax and do things they enjoy!

However it doesn’t necessarily mean that no schoolwork is done during this time. Go through this checklist to see if you need to do any work in the holiday break:

  1. ASSESSMENTS: If there are assessments due in the first few weeks of the next term, students will need to work on these assessments, and possibly complete them depending on the due date.
  2. EXAMS: If exams will be held in the next term then students should use some time in the holidays to get their study notes up to date. If the exams are early in the term, then students will need to also study during the holidays.
  3. SENIOR EXAMS: For senior students who have major exams after the holidays, the holidays will be a period of intense study and not a time of relaxation.
  4. AREAS OF WEAKNESS: The holidays can also be a time for pinpointing areas of weakness. For example, students may spend some time reviewing Mathematics topics they found difficult or reviewing the grammar in a language they are learning.

Apart from these, we do want students to have a chance to refresh their mind and body, catch up on their sleep and take the time to focus on healthy lifestyle and quality time with family and friends.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #82 – TEST-TAKING TECHNIQUES

by psalter on November 1, 2016

What do you do in the few days before an examination?

At least a few days before the exam, make sure you do the following:  

  • Plan out how much time you should spend on each section of the test.
  • By looking at past papers, get a feel for the types of instructions that will be on your paper.
  • Do some exercise so you can burn off the pent-up stress that can come before exams.
  • Look after your body – lots of water to juice up your brain, healthy food, decent sleep.
  • To calm nerves, make mental pictures of yourself sitting down and doing well in the test.
  • Purchase any equipment you may need, extra calculator batteries, pens, rulers etc.
  • Ensure you know what equipment is allowed in the test or exam.
  • Focus on reviewing the key points, perhaps a condensed version of your summaries.
  • Practise as many past test papers as you can get your hands on.
  • Check the timetable to ensure you have a clear picture of when each exam is being held.

The night before the test or exam:

  • Pack your bag with everything you will need for the next day, ensuring you have all necessary equipment.
  • Plan what time you need to leave to ensure you have plenty of time for unexpected delays.
  • Don’t go to bed too late – you need to make sure your brain is fresh and alert.
  • Don’t ring friends and discuss your preparation or the examination.
  • Just before you go to sleep, look through your notes briefly.
  • If you have a number of exams, check the timetable to doubly confirm the date, time and location of the exam.

 The morning of the test or exam:

  • Visualise success. Before you get out of bed close your eyes and picture yourself going into the exam, doing well and coming out pleased with your efforts.
  • Review your notes. You are not doing intense study at this stage, just looking through and reminding yourself of the main things you want to remember.
  • Eat breakfast. Your brain needs fuel so eat a hearty breakfast so you can focus and concentrate in the exam.
  • Be on time. Make sure you leave enough time for contingencies so you won’t be late.
  • Avoid negativity. Don’t stand around in the group discussing what you did and didn’t study.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #81 – PREPARING FOR EXAMS

by psalter on October 1, 2016

Exams coming up this term?

Follow these steps to help you achieve your personal academic best:

  1. Find out what you need to learn: ask your teacher if you will be tested on the whole year’s work or just the second half of the year.
  2. Make your study notes:  You want to get your study notes finished as quickly as possible.
  3. Learn your study notes: make sure you remember what you study by testing yourself as you learn.
  4. Practise the skills of the subject: do as many different questions, revision sheets, chapter reviews, sample essays or past examination papers as you can.
  5. Review your test-taking techniques: this ensures you make the most of the time in the exam.
  6. And when you get your exam paper back make the most of it by carefully reviewing everything you got wrong.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #80 – A MESSAGE TO YEAR 12

by psalter on September 1, 2016

These last few months of Year 12 can be overwhelming as the focus just seems to be on marks, marks, marks.

So here are some important things to remember:

Yes this year is important. And yes you want to get the best marks you can. BUT.

A very big but.

You as a person are not defined by a number alone.

There are always alternate paths to get to where you want to go in life. The marks might make it quicker or easier but if you really want to get somewhere, if you are passionate about what you want to do, you will find a way to make it happen. Many people don’t get their first preference at university, so start off in one course then transfer after a year to the one they really wanted.

Lots of students leave school and find out that they actually have some incredible skills, they just weren’t academic! They discover that they are really good at lots and lots of stuff and that in the end, the marks did not make that much difference to their final career.

Really what you want after the next few months is to walk away with no regret, to be able to walk away saying no matter what, I really did the best I could – rather than I threw away twelve years of school just because I couldn’t be bothered pushing hard in the last few months. Doing your best is all anyone should expect of you, teachers, parents and even yourself.

These can be challenging months and you will be so over study by the end of it. Remember everyone has to go through it and the good news is it is never like this again! Just keep saying to yourself each day, this is one day less and I will never ever have to study like this again. The hardest part of Year 12 is finding the self-discipline to make yourself do the study when you don’t feel like doing it! So hang in there, persist, just take it day by day and make use of the support structures around you through the school, family and friends.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #79 – 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE STUDENTS

by psalter on August 1, 2016

7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE STUDENTS

Effective students are those who have learnt to study smarter rather than harder. Below is a list of the top 7 habits that effective students do.

  1. MAKE THE MOST OF CLASSTIME: If you have to sit in class anyway, then you may as well make the most of the experience. Time wasted in class is lost learning opportunities or time you need to make up. To make the most of classtime stay on task and be as involved as you can in the lesson.
  2. ASK QUESTIONS OFTEN: Students who are effective will ask questions when they don’t understand something, they don’t wait until 3 weeks into the topic then say ‘I don’t understand any of this!’. So if you aren’t sure about something, then ask your teacher.
  3. COMPLETE ALL HOMEWORK: Your teachers are giving you the homework for a reason – even if you are unsure what the reason might be! It is all part of building your learning in the subject. So don’t think that you know more than them – instead put 100% effort into completing all homework to the best of your ability.
  4. DO INDEPENDENT LEARNING: Students who do well academically do more than just the set homework. Rather than cramming just before an exam they learn as they go. This means the nights they don’t have much homework they step up and take responsibility for their learning and ask themselves ‘what else could I be doing to help me understand and learn my subjects?’. Often this entails reviewing previous work that was difficult or preparing study notes in advance.
  5. ARE FOCUSED WHEN WORKING: Students who are effective usually work in blocks of time at home, anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, but in that time they focus on the task at hand. This means they have removed all distractions and commit that when they are working on schoolwork, they are just working on schoolwork – no personal activities at the same time.
  6. WORK SMART FOR ASSESSMENTS: Effective students spend time when they are given an assessment ensuring they understand the requirements and the marking criteria. They work to the guidelines of the assessment and approach the task systematically, making a plan and setting targets for when they want to complete each step.
  7. NEVER CONFUSE ‘READING’ WITH ‘STUDYING’: Effective learners know how to study properly for a test. They know that just reading your notes over and over is not an effective way to learn. Instead they read a section then test themselves on it, seeing what they can say out loud or write down. They also do lots of revision questions or past exam papers so they can practise the skills of the subject and identify areas of weakness.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #78 – MID YEAR CHECK UP

by psalter on June 29, 2016

As we approach the second semester now is a good time for you to do a bit of a check-up to see if you can improve your approach to school. Here are some questions you can ask yourself:

  • Have you set yourself goals to strive for over this year? YES / NO
  • Do you know what motivates you to do work? YES / NO
  • Do you try to take a positive approach to your studies? YES / NO
  • Do you make an effort to make the thoughts in your head positive ones? YES / NO
  • Are you making the most of class time, listening and focusing and completing all work? YES / NO
  • Have you been asking for help if you don’t understand something? YES / NO
  • Have you been writing all your homework into your diary or online planner and getting it done? YES / NO
  • Have you been breaking down bigger tasks and scheduling the work in your diary/planner? YES / NO
  • Have you been keeping track of what you complete and rescheduling unfinished work? YES / NO
  • Have you organised your folders for papers and digital resources for school? YES / NO
  • Do you have folders or somewhere at home to file away all your work for your topics? YES / NO
  • Have you decided what you will keep or do your study notes in? YES / NO
  • Have you been working on study notes each time you finish a topic for a subject? YES / NO
  • Do you have a term planner above your desk where you can easily see the heavy weeks? YES / NO
  • Have you set up a good study environment at home, a place where you can focus and work? YES / NO
  • Are you doing around an hour and a half of schoolwork most nights (2-3 hrs for seniors)? YES / NO
  • Have you thought realistically about whether you have too many outside school activities? YES / NO
  • Have you allocated set periods of time for school work (eg at least 3 x half hour blocks)? YES / NO
  • Do you remove all distractions etc. when you are focusing on your schoolwork at home? YES / NO
  • Do you prioritise each afternoon what you will work on that night? YES / NO
  • When you make study notes, are you making them visual with mind maps, highlighting etc? YES / NO
  • When you study for a test, do you both ‘learn’ the content and ‘practise’ the skills? YES / NO
  • Do you try to do lots of the practise under examination conditions? YES / NO
  • Have you reviewed the different study techniques that you should use for your learning style? YES / NO
  • Are you doing more than ‘just reading’ when you study for an assessment? YES / NO
  • Have you thought about how you will overcome the obstacles you face in achieving your best? YES / NO
  • Have you set up some routines to try and create habits that will help you this year? YES / NO

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #77 – PROOFING ASSESSMENTS

by psalter on June 1, 2016

1st Proof:

It’s a good idea to relocate from your work space for this. For example, take your assignment to a park or another room – somewhere you will sit with new focus for a set time. Go to this place with the sole purpose to proof. Ensure you take the criteria, what the question is asking with you. Your first proof needs to take into account the following factors.

  • WORD COUNT: Is the word count of your assessment within the specified limit? If it is not, note how many words need to be cut.
  • SPELLING / GRAMMAR: Spelling and grammar need to be correct. If you are using a computer, spell check will help – but don’t rely on it. For example, you might have typed ‘from’ when you meant ‘form’. The spell check won’t pick that up.
  • SOURCES: Are all sources listed for visuals, examples and quotes?
  • CRITERIA / QUESTION ANSWERED? Check the criteria and tick where you have addressed the criteria. You will then ensure your assignment answers everything asked.
  • REPETITION: It’s easy to repeat points, double check you haven’t done this.
  • USEFUL INFORMATION: It’s not uncommon to write unnecessary information. Do you have points that don’t really answer the question? Have you written clearly? Is there any information you could leave out? Is there any information that you realise needs to be added?
  • REINFORCE: This is where you need to finalise which words you will bold, highlight, underline etc. so your assignment clearly identifies the main points. Bolding can let the teacher see clearly that you have covered all the parts of the question, that there is a sequence of ideas and you have organised the information well.
  • FIX: Make sure that when you are back at your desk you fix all of the errors you have found.

2nd Proof:

The next day repeat the above steps, but this time – READ YOUR ASSIGNMENT OUT LOUD! If you didn’t print your assignment to proof the first time, now could be the time. Reading and hearing the words spoken in different mediums can sometimes give a new perspective to your writing. Note down any changes you need to make, and make them.

3rd Proof:

It’s always a good idea to ask someone to proof your assignment after you have proofed it first. It is common for the writer not to pick up typos or silly mistakes because he/she knows what they meant and sees the words they intended to write, and not the errors. So recruit a proof reader (parent, relatives, older sibling or friend etc.).

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #76 – STARTING ASSIGNMENTS STRAIGHT AWAY

by psalter on May 1, 2016

Ever leave your assignments until the last minute? Well here are 5 reasons to start work on your assignments immediately.

- GET YOUR BRAIN THINKING ABOUT THE TOPIC: At the very least, read through the requirements of the assignment on the day you get your assignment. Even if you are not thinking about it directly, your subconscious will be hard at work.

- FIND LIBRARY RESOURCES: Although the library may not be your main source of reference, you should drop in soon after receiving the assignment. Reference books, resources and magazines will disappear quickly. It is not a good idea to only use Google.

- DISCOVER OTHER RESOURCES: You could also ask your local librarian for any additional direction on where to look for resource material for your assignment. Librarians know how to help people access relevant information, in books, journals and in computer based references.

- STARTING EARLY MEANS MORE TIME TO EXPLORE & ASK FOR HELP: Your initial research might be on assignment points you’ve identified through the library, references your teacher may have given you, school textbooks, and/or general internet search engines. If you start this early, you could discover that you don’t actually understand important concepts and that perhaps you need to speak to your teacher to get further clarity.

- CREATE A SAFETY NET: Starting your assignment immediately will give you a safety net in case you get sick, or something unexpected happens. You should always have a schedule that allows for the unexpected.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #75 – MAKING GREAT STUDY NOTES

by psalter on April 1, 2016

With the end of term approaching it is time to think about study notes. But why now? Well many students wait until just before examination time to even consider their study notes then there is no time to learn them and no time to practise the skills of the subject. If you will have tests later in the year, then a smart thing to do is to get all of the Term 1 study notes up to date during the holidays.

Can you imagine coming back Term 2, you haven’t done your study notes for Term 1 and you get slammed with new work – it becomes impossible to catch up! So make a smart decision and ensure you have all of your Term 1 study notes complete by the end of the term.

Top 5 tips to improve notes:

  1. POINTS: Avoid long sentences and focus on key points.
  2. TABLES: Use tables wherever possible to create structure.
  3. KEY WORDS: Pull out keys words (as shown in this list).
  4. HIGHLIGHT: Make sure the key content stands out (but don’t go crazy with colour).
  5. FEEDBACK: Show notes to teachers, parents and friends so they can suggest ways to improve them.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #74 – STARTING THE DAY WELL

by psalter on March 1, 2016

Do you find it hard to get out of bed some days and be positive about going to school and learning? It can be hard to turn the day around when you wake up like this and don’t take steps to start your day in a positive way. Your approach in the first hour of the day dictates the direction of your day of learning at school.

To ensure you start your mornings well you need to make sure you have a night-time and wake-up routine.

  1. Set Your Intentions Before Bed: consciously decide every night to create a positive expectation for the next morning.
  2. Move Your Alarm Clock Across The Room: so you have to get up to turn it off.
  3. Brush Your Teeth: when you wake up and splash water on your face.
  4. Drink a Full Glass of Water: to hydrate yourself after several hours without water.
  5. Add some of the following ideas to your own routines.

The “Miracle Morning” is a book written by Hal Elrod and he speaks about starting your morning with “Life SAVERS”. The idea is that you add some of these to your morning routine or come up with your own activities for a positive start to the morning:

  • Silence can be meditation, mindfulness, prayer etc.
  • Affirmation can be a word you use that reminds you of who you are and how to be.
  • Visualisation is an intention (directing your focus) on how you want your day to be.
  • Exercise can be a short walk or stretching or going for a run (exercise is a great thing to do in the morning).
  • Reading something that is positive and enjoyable. What you read “resonates” with you. It gets you thinking and expanding “beyond yourself”.
  • Scribe is about journaling. Writing in your journal about your day gives you insight and clarity about issues. It also helps you realise what’s working and how far you have come.

These tips are courtesy of www.humanconnections.com.au

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #73 – ACHIEVING GOALS

by psalter on February 1, 2016

A big step towards achieving your goals is developing and maintaining a goal setting mindset as the attitudes you have learnt and develop will influence the way you view goal setting.

Approaching a task with a negative and self-defeating attitude makes it much harder to actually be successful at that task.

You need to have a positive attitude when you are setting and trying to achieve your goals. A positive attitude means you are looking for ways to succeed rather than focusing on the difficulties and obstacles that could be in your path.

To create a more positive attitude:

  • Each day note down something you did towards achieving your goals.
  • Note down any changes someone else has noticed eg. your teacher says well done on your work.
  • Don’t stop trying if something goes wrong, rather reassess your goals or decide you need to work harder to achieve them.
  • Find a mentor or helper to encourage you to achieve your goals, possibly someone who is interested in the same things or is good at the same subjects, but is a bit further ahead of you.

Other reasons why we don’t achieve our goals:

  • No action plan.
  • No true commitment to the goal.
  • Not rewarding yourself along the way.
  • Trying to focus on too many goals.
  • Not preparing yourself for success.
  • Fear of failure.

If you are still not achieving your goal try this:

  • Clarify your goal.
  • Write a list of actions.
  • Analyze, prioritize and prune.
  • Organise your list into a plan.
  • Monitor the execution of your plan and review your plan regularly

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #72 – IT’S GOAL SETTING TIME

by psalter on January 1, 2016

The start of the year is a great time to set yourself some academic goals along with any personal goals you might plan to achieve this year.

There are lots of great reasons to set goals:

• Setting goals gets you to think about possibilities.
• Goals give you a direction to work towards.
• Goals give you a clear picture of where you want to go.
• Goals help you to push yourself just that little bit more.
• Goals help you have a more fun and fulfilled life.
• Goals can give you motivation and focus.
• Setting goals helps you do all the things you want to do in life!
• Goals give us the motivation to do things that are difficult and challenging in order to reach a particular desired state.
• Goals help us achieve our dreams, hopes and desires.
• Goals help us look for an achievable balance between the different areas of our life.
• Goals make us feel good about ourselves and our achievements and help us to increase our self-esteem and sense of self-worth.
• Goals give us a greater feeling of control over our lives and experiences.
• Goals allow us to prioritise and create action plans.

There are different types of goals you can set based on the timeframe in which you want to achieve these goals:

Short-term goals: are things you want to do today, tomorrow or within the next few weeks and sometimes months.
Medium-term goals: are things you want to achieve in the next few months or sometime even within the next year.
Long-term goals: are things you want to do later on in life, whether it is next year, two years’ time, ten years’ time or even longer.

You may decide to set a mix of these types of goals. To give yourself the best chance of achieving your goals, it is a good idea to make sure your goals are SMARTIES – so keep in mind these guidelines for setting effective goals:

Specific: Make goals very detailed and specific. Exactly what do you want to achieve?
Measurable: You want to be able to know when you have achieved your goal so make sure there is some way to measure your success.
Action-Oriented: Your short-term goals should really be the action steps you need to take to achieve the medium and longer term goals.
Relevant & Realistic: Goals change, so if your goal is no longer relevant, you need to change it.
Time-Based: Your goals need to have a ‘to complete by’ date to give you something to aim for.
Interesting: Make your goals about things that you find interesting and worthwhile.
Emotional: Use powerful language to express the emotion behind the goals.
Success oriented: Express your goals in a positive and success focused way.

And….
– Only use POSITIVE language in goals.
– Use PASSIONATE, enthusiastic and motivating language.
– Write your goal in the PRESENT tense.

Review your goals regularly to remind yourself of what you want to achieve and to stimulate your mind to think of other possibilities. Start taking specific actions that will help you achieve your goals, in particular your short-term goals. Putting together an action plan of the steps to achieve the goal and allocating timeframes for each action is a good place to start.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #71 – MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION

by psalter on December 1, 2015

7 Ways Mindfulness and Meditation Can be Helpful to Students

Want to try something new over the school holidays? Why not give meditation a go? There are lots of great Apps out there, for example ‘Mindfulness’, ‘Headspace’, ‘Relax’ and ‘Positivity’. These will guide you through simple meditation and mindfulness exercises. You could even try the new mindfulness colouring-in books for adults that are all the rage. But what is it all about and why should you try it?

What is Mindfulness?

Headspace (www.headspace.com) defines mindfulness as “the intention to be present in the here and now, fully engaged in whatever is happening, free from distraction or judgement, with a soft and open mind”. 

What is Meditation?

Meditation is a way of transforming the mind, making it calm and silent.  According to the Australian Teachers of Meditation Association meditation is a discipline that involves turning the mind and attention inward and focusing on a single thought, image, object or feeling.

How does meditation and practicing mindfulness help you with your schoolwork?

  1. Reduces anxiety and risk of depression.
  2. Increases resilience.
  3. Improves ability to learn and recall information.
  4. Improves concentration.
  5. Improves creativity.
  6. Helps manage exam stress.
  7. Leads to better sleep.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #70 – MANAGING EXPECTATIONS ABOUT RESULTS

by psalter on November 1, 2015

Parents often have high expectations of their children in relation to how much homework they will do, and what results they will achieve in their studies. These expectations may result from cultural beliefs, personal experiences, desire for children to have better opportunities than their parents had and the like. Research shows that whilst parental expectations can play a significant part in children achieving high results, they can also contribute to high levels of student stress.

Some things to think about in relation to parental expectations include:

  1. Setting realistic goals: Keep talking to your parents about what you want to achieve, in individual subjects, at school overall and in other aspects of your life. Your career goals may mean you want to focus intensively on something like art or music, rather than maths or science. Helping to identify your goals will enable you to determine what subjects you need to focus on and what marks you are likely to need, which means that effort can be concentrated on the areas which will help you to achieve your goals.
  2. Involve your parents in your learning: Throughout the term talk to your parents about what you are studying. Show them your bookwork and homework. The more they understand about what you are doing and how you are going along the way, the better they will be able to set and manage their expectations.
  3. Ensure your parents develop an understanding of the school’s assessment and reporting structures: Assessment and reporting systems change over time and are different in different schools, states and countries. Making sure your parents really understand what your report means may help them to understand what you are actually achieving. Your school can explain these to them if need be. Sometimes students are excelling, but reporting structures don’t clearly represent this to parents.
  4. Remember nobody is perfect: Even the brightest, most highly motivated student will struggle at times. You may struggle to understand a particular topic or concept, or you may struggle with motivation, particularly for a subject you don’t particularly enjoy. Problems with teachers or peers can also contribute. It is unrealistic that anyone can work with 100% effort all the time.
  5. Providing practical homework and exam support: Ask your parents if they can provide practical help to enable you to access past papers or practise questions and work with you by helping with things like proofreading and reviewing drafts, checking work and listening to speeches.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #69 – DEALING WITH EXAM PRESSURE

by psalter on October 1, 2015

Top 10 things you need to do/remember about dealing with exam pressure:

  1. KNOW YOUR MATERIAL
  2. PRACTISE, PRACTISE, PRACTISE
  3. FUEL YOUR BODY AND YOUR MIND
  4. MANAGE THE PHYSICAL SIGNS OF STRESS
  5. HAVE A GOOD BREAKFAST AND GET TO SCHOOL ON TIME
  6. VISUALISE SUCCESS
  7. INVOLVE YOUR PARENTS IN YOUR SCHOOLWORK
  8. TALK TO YOUR PARENTS ABOUT REALISTIC GOALS
  9. UNDERSTAND PARENTS’ EXPECTATIONS.
  10. ASK FOR HELP

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #68 – DEALING WITH PROCRASTINATION

by psalter on August 30, 2015

Procrastination is the act of putting off a task which you know you have to do, even though you know that putting it off will probably be worse for you in the long run. For example, when you procrastinate about starting an assignment it doesn’t make the assignment go away, or the deadline change, it just gives you less time to get the work done. To manage this, students can try the following:

TIPS FOR STUDENTS

  1. Become aware of the excuses you use – make a mental note when you procrastinate. What excuses do you give yourself? Too tired? Too difficult? Too boring? Being aware is the first step in changing your behaviour. Keep yourself honest by asking questions like “is this the best use of my time at the moment?” and “am I doing this as a way of avoiding what I really should be doing?”.
  2. Reduce or eliminate distractions – creating a clear, uncluttered work environment which is free from distractions will help you avoid procrastinating. Turn off your social media or WiFi, turn off your music or TV, close the door. It’s easy to get distracted and lose focus on what you are trying to do, or to procrastinate by surfing websites that are barely related to the topic you are meant to be researching. Schools that subscribe to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au can find out more in the Home Study Environment unit and Dealing with Distractions unit.
  3. Make a prioritised list – before you start work (or procrastinating) take a few minutes to work out what your priorities for the session are, based on your deadlines. Take into account all the time you have available and make a prioritised list. Work on the most important thing first. There is more information in the Time Management Skills unit on techniques for prioritising for schools that subscribe to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au.
  4. Break down projects into chunks – if you have a big task that you have to do, or something that you really don’t want to start, have a think about how it can be broken up into smaller parts. A big assignment might need a plan, the purchase of resources, a trip to the library, internet based research, and then several days to write and edit each section. If you just focus on doing one of these tasks it’s easier to commence.
  5. Just start – stop focusing on getting it done perfectly, or even well, just make a start, even if it’s just for a few minutes. Starting the task makes you realise it’s not as daunting as you originally thought and allows you to make a small amount of progress which encourages you to keep going. Sometimes once you get started you can even do more than you originally thought you could or would.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #67 – SLEEP

by psalter on August 1, 2015

TOP TIPS FOR A GREAT SLEEP ROUTINE

 Sleep is so important to ensure the learning from the day is consolidated.

  • Have a regular bed time and wake up time. A regular bed time helps to set your body clock so your body knows it’s time to sleep. Waking up at (or near) the same time each day also helps your body to establish a sleep pattern. Get plenty of sunlight during the day too.
  • Establish a bed time ritual. Doing a series of actions before bed also helps your body to prepare for sleep. Ideas include, a warm bath or shower, reading a book, listening to quiet music or doing some gentle stretches.
  • Avoid technology in the hour before bed, including TV, computers and phones.
  • Exercise during the day so that your body is ready for rest at night.
  • Don’t eat big meals at night. Eat as early as possible and try to avoid rich, heavy food close to bed time.
  • Limit your caffeine during the day and don’t drink any caffeine in the afternoon or evening.
  • Don’t have too much liquid in the evening….and if you are drinking, consider a herbal tea like chamomile.
  • Worrying about problems at school or with friends often stops you from getting to sleep. Talk to a trusted person about things that are worrying you to find ways to solve your problems. You could also try some relaxation exercises such as meditation or positive visualisation.
  • Have your room as dark as possible when trying to get to sleep. Use a sleep mask if you need to avoid light e.g. from electronic devices, street lights etc.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #66 – BLUE LIGHT

by psalter on July 1, 2015

WHY STUDENTS NEED TO TURN OFF DEVICES AN HOUR BEFORE SLEEP

Artificial light from electronic and other devices generally emit a blue light (it may not actually look blue, but that is the underlying light).  Blue light, along with ultraviolet light is a type of non-visible light at a very short wavelength.  You can see an image of the spectrum here: http://www.bluelightexposed.com/#what-is-blue-light.

What does blue light do to the human body?

Non-visible light has a lot of energy and studies show that a lot of exposure to this type of light can do damage to your eyes and also impair your sleep cycle. During sleep lots of essential physical processes take place and it is also when learning from the day is consolidated in memory. So getting enough sleep is essential for students.

Blue light is naturally generated only during the day, from sunlight.  When it gets dark, naturally occurring blue light ceases, signalling the body to produce melatonin, the hormone associated with sleep. Using artificial lighting and devices which emit a blue light at night confuses the body-clock (the body’s natural sleep-wake cycle) by stopping the body from producing melatonin.  This can result in disrupted sleep patterns including difficulty in falling asleep and staying asleep and shortened sleep duration.

Those at greatest risk from night-time exposure to blue light are those with existing sleep disorders and adolescents who often experience delayed sleep patterns as a result of biological changes.

What can I do to limit my exposure to blue light at night?

Some suggestions include:

  • Be exposed to sunlight during the day to assist in accurately setting your body clock.
  • Stop using all electronic devices preferably at least 2 hours before bed.
  • Turn off all artificial lighting 1-2 hours before bed.
  • Get a red or orange reading lamp, which does not emit blue light.
  • Use blue light blocking glasses at night.
  • Install a program or app on your computer or device to change the type of light it emits. A variety of programs are available including F.lux, EasyEyez, Night Filter, Zzz iPhone filter, Bluelight and Twilight
  • Invert the colours on your iPhone or iPad.
  • Turn the brightness down on your device for a few hours before bed (not perfect, but better than nothing!).

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #65 – MOVING INFO INTO LONG TERM MEMORY

by psalter on May 31, 2015

The following are some tips which may help you to move information from short to long term memory.

  • BE ENGAGED: If you are interested in what you are learning you are more likely to remember it. Ask questions, pre-read information, make summaries and follow up on things you don’t understand.
  • USE REPETITION: Repetition is key to transferring information from short term to long term memory. The more often you practice a technique, or revise your information the better it will transfer to long term memory.
  • RECORD INFO: Don’t just write down everything your teacher says, or copy straight from a textbook or the Internet. Think about what is being communicated and create notes that are accurate, meaningful to you and build connections. Mind maps are a helpful tool for this.
  • ORGANISE INFO: When you are studying for a topic, make sure you organise the information into small, distinct chunks.
  • VISUALISE INFO: Build a mental picture of what you are trying to remember, like the parts of a plant or a battle in history.
  • BUILD ASSOCIATIONS: This might mean developing some kind of sensory cue which enables you to remember information such as smell or sound. Try turning your notes into a song or poem.
  • SHAKE THINGS UP: Write in a crazy font, use lots of colours, use your left hand to write instead of your right…anything that makes your brain have to engage more actively with what it is you are trying to learn.
  • FUEL YOUR BRAIN: If you want your brain to work well for you, you also need to work well for your brain. Eating foods rich in Omega 3 and essential fatty acids (such as fish, nuts, legumes and leafy green vegetables) will help your brain to function optimally. Drink lots of water so that your brain doesn’t dehydrate. Keep away from too much caffeine which may impair brain function.
  • REST YOUR BRAIN: Getting fresh air and exercise helps your brain to process information, as does sleep. Most students need 8-10 hours of sleep a night. The last stage of memory consolidation takes place while you are sleeping so ensure you get enough sleep each night.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #64 – IT’S ALL ABOUT ATTITUDE

by psalter on May 1, 2015

When students start secondary school, they are usually very positive and optimistic about school. Then things can start to get harder, a bit more challenging, maybe they get a bad mark and become discouraged, or maybe their friends start to influence their attitude. Some students are able to overcome these challenges, while others let it affect their attitude and application to school.

Take the time to determine reasons to put in effort into your schoolwork.

Think about which of the following reasons might be motivating for you:

  • To achieve the best mark you are capable of at school.
  • To give you lots of options for what subjects you can choose in the senior years.
  • To give you lots of options of what you can choose to do when you leave school.
  • To have a personal sense of satisfaction about doing your best.
  • To show your gratitude to your parents for giving you an education.
  • To avoid getting in trouble from your teachers.
  • To avoid getting in trouble from your parents.
  • To avoid getting a detention or other negative consequences from not working.
  • To avoid disappointing your parents.
  • So you don’t feel bad about wasting your parent’s time and money giving you an education.

We often talk about ‘carrot’ and ‘stick’ people. If you want a donkey to move forward, you can either lead it forward with a carrot (a reward) or whack it with a stick (punishment).

Some students are motivated by working towards rewards, positive consequences of doing the right thing, while others are motivated to avoid negative consequences. Which do you think you are?

Understanding what motivates you and what affects your attitude can make it easier for you to make positive changes.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #63 – MAKING THE MOST OF CLASSTIME

by psalter on April 1, 2015

So what are the advantages of using classtime efficiently? Well, you will complete more work in class and have less to do at home, your teacher will be pleased with your application and so will your parents when they read your report, and of course, you will learn more! And if you don’t use classtime efficiently? Well you will have to do more work at home, you will find you don’t always understand the work, your teachers will have to be continually disciplining you and you may even make it harder for other people in your class to learn. So what does working effectively in class mean?

  1. Sit next to someone who will help you stay on task.
  2. Ask questions whenever you are unsure, unclear or do not understand something.
  3. Be polite and respectful of your teacher and your classmates.
  4. Come to the lesson with all the books, technology and equipment you will need.
  5. Contribute your thoughts and ideas at the appropriate times.
  6. If you find yourself day-dreaming ask yourself questions about what is going on.
  7. Try at all times to stay on task and be focused on the work you are doing.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #62 – READING FROM SCREENS VERSUS PRINTED MATERIALS

by psalter on March 1, 2015

Students now spend a lot of time reading from a screen: computers, kindle, mobile devices. The research into the implications of this are still in the early stages, however current evidence indicates that at this point in time print may be slightly superior to the screen in relation to comprehension, learning, retention and ease of use. enhanced-learning-books-out However, as screen technology continues to advance, interfaces become increasingly intuitive and personal preferences change from early exposure to reading on a screen, this may change – and may have already changed for some individuals. Technology is here to stay, so the key pieces of advice for students (and parents) are listed below. One of the best articles to read on this debate is by Jabr (2013) The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=reading-paper-screens.

Advice for Students:

DEVELOP BOTH PAPER AND DIGITAL LITERACY SKILLS

Students need to develop their reading, comprehension and learning skills in both arenas. They need to develop one set of skills to build their competence in reading and learning from paper, however they also need to develop a completely different set of skills: digital literacy and navigation skills. Some parents are critical of the use of technology in schools and fearful that students’ handwriting and learning will be affected (Salter, 2013), however in an increasingly digital world it would be irresponsible of schools to neglect developing students’ digital literacy skills. Two of the units that are useful in this area on www.studyskillshandbook.com.au are the Reading Skills unit and Technology Tools unit.

CREATE OPPORTUNITIES TO MAINTAIN HANDWRITING SKILLS 

Finland has long been known as a leader in many educational aspects. Recently it was announced that Finland will no longer teach cursive handwriting in schools. They will continue to teach printing, however, when students would normally transition to ‘running writing’ instead they will learn keyboarding skills. This signals a change in the traditional approach. In Australia there is comprehensive testing being undertaken to look at holding both Naplan and final Year 12 examinations online. There are no indications as to when this will take place. At this point in time, as tests and examinations are still handwritten, students are advised that when it comes to exam time, they should handwrite their study notes or if typed then print them out when they are learning them. They should also actively create opportunities to maintain their handwriting skills, consciously choosing to handwrite at times when they might normally type. Visit the Writing Skills unit for tips on improving handwriting as well as some special pens that will assist.

LEARN TO TOUCH TYPE

While we have had the ability to dictate into a device for some time, this is still not in common usage. Learning to touch type is a skill that definitely pays off in the senior years in terms of saving huge amounts of time. There are links to free learning to touch type websites in the Technology Tools unit.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #61 – PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT

by psalter on February 1, 2015

Whilst parents are often involved in their teenager’s sporting, musical or dramatic activities, parental support on the sidelines of their adolescent child’s studies can also be beneficial, particularly to academic performance. Research shows that children are more likely to succeed if parents are involved in their learning. Hendersen and Mapp (2002) found that ‘the more families support their children’s learning and educational progress, the more their children tend to do well in school and continue their education’.

Students need to understand and communicate to parents what they can do to be involved. Below are the strategies we would tell parents, you may like to ask your parent to read through these.

Strategies for Parents to help their secondary school aged students achieve their potential:

  • WORK ENVIRONMENT

The obvious logistical support is providing a quiet, open space with few distractions for working at home. Involve your student in creating this space. Workspace tools for effective learning include a desk, ergonomic chair, a noticeboard and good lighting, as well as a shelf or drawers for folders, reference books and non-essential work. Spending time to discuss options, alternatives and reasons for establishing a dedicated work area is valuable.

  • BREAKFAST

Importantly students need to start the day with a nutritional breakfast, as this will increase energy, attention, concentration and memory, particularly if the breakfast includes grains, fibre, protein and is low in sugar. Parents can facilitate this good start to the day as part of the daily routine. Similarly, nutritious snacks and lunch will enable the student to remain more focused throughout the day.

  • ORGANISATION

A calendar for each term should be created and displayed near your student’s desk and in prominent thoroughfares in the home, such as the kitchen. The calendar or term planner should include: all co-curricular and social activities, as well as assignment, assessment or test dates. This helps the student see the big picture of commitments and not simply a weekly or daily version as school diaries or digital devices usually allow. The student, and parent, can clearly see when heavy workload periods occur, and social activities can be tailored to ensure work has a priority. It’s a good idea to sit down with your student every couple of days to discuss the schedule ahead, when the work can be slotted in, and how a parent could help by reducing family commitments, or by setting boundaries with social engagements. Regularly sitting down to discuss workloads and tasks due, reviewing activities and schedules can help students learn to be more productive and organized.

  • FILING SYSTEMS

Master folders should be set up for each subject at home, so after each topic is completed the notes can be placed in appropriate categories. This also gives students somewhere to file completed tests and assignments. Most students carry their current notes to school each day, but naturally as the term and year progresses it’s impossible (and risky if misplaced) to have all worknotes in one folder. Students may also need help organising the files on their computers and devices (although it is likely that many students know more about this than their parents!).

  • ROUTINES

Helping your student to establish routines can add an element of calm to each day. Simple routines such as having the school bag packed and uniform ready before going to bed each night, can eliminate unnecessary angst in the morning. A useful addition to the evening schedule is to determine the next afternoon’s program: when homework and daily revision will be done around co-curricular activities, dinner etc. This can give a clear direction when your student comes home each day. Some students find that having regular times set aside for schoolwork each day helps them to develop a routine of working. Other students will need to make a plan each afternoon as their schedule changes each day.

  • TIMETABLE

Know your student’s timetable, so it’s easy and relevant to ask “What were you doing in Science today?” A specific question can often open a conversation where your student not only shares but, in doing so, reinforces what was learned which increases memory (and understanding) of the lesson.

  • SUBJECTS

Know your student’s subjects, and become aware of the topics covered each year in those subjects. ‘Improved educational outcomes result from a genuine interest and active engagement from parents’ (OECD 2011), so knowing the topics could allow parents to expose students to different dimensions of the subject through film, books, contemporary issues, the Internet, exhibitions, travel etc. Students appreciate, perhaps subconsciously, that the parent is truly interested in their learning and what they are learning.  Some schools will give students a course outline and the state’s educational body will also have a website where parents should be able to access the syllabus (what will be taught) for each subject.

  • ASSIGNMENTS

A helpful strategy is to keep abreast of when assignments are given. Talking to your student about assignment expectations, drawing out their understanding of the topic, criteria and parts of the assignment can instill a deeper appreciation. It’s good to probe and ask more about the assignment topic with questions, as this could give your student other perspectives, and once more, help the student feel the parent has a real interest in learning. When planning the workload for an assignment, parents can help break the work into chunks or parts. This can reduce the sense of the overwhelming enormity of the task and the task can be broken into manageable parts, which are then scheduled to be done into the calendar or diary.

  • TESTS

Similarly, parents can help students prepare for tests by quizzing them, asking for concepts to be explained or helping write practice tests. Explain to your student that memory and understanding can increase if the brain is using multiple processes to use information, such as writing, reading, speaking, drawing or singing! When tests are returned, focus on what was achieved and note concepts to revise. If students know parents are not solely focused on the grade, but also on the process, and that tests (and assignments) are tools to learn, intrinsic motivation can develop.

  • CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

There comes a time in secondary school when some co-curricular activities need to be cut for a period of time, as academic demands increase or the student is juggling too much. It’s unlikely students will initiate severing an activity so it’s generally up to parents. Students, like adults, can give more to an activity when there is time, and academic work needs to be one of the main priorities during the school terms. Parents will often be the first to notice when their student is over-loaded (and it varies for each individual), when school work is rushed or dismissed, when their student is tired or out-of-sorts, when they have no “downtime” on weeknights. Everyone needs some downtime, even if it is only for an hour of escapist freedom.

  • TECHNOLOGY

Parents need to be the “bad cop” when it comes to limiting computer games, or other digital device activity. It is advisable that devices are not in bedrooms when students go to bed. However, rather than dictating the rule, parents should talk about the need for solid, sufficient sleep for the brain to re-wire neural pathways to consolidate the day’s learning. Lack of sleep can lead to reduced concentration and attention span, delayed response time, and decreased short-term memory.  Rules for technology (including TV viewing) should be developed together if possible so there is agreement about the approach.

  • COMMUNICATION WITH THE SCHOOL

It’s now fully acknowledged that together, parents and teachers play a dual role in educating students, so it’s vital to maintain open communication with the school. It’s important for parents to keep abreast of school information conveyed through newsletters, school portals, emails and so on, as it’s not uncommon for a student to miss information at school. This allows parents to flag or discuss with their student what the school is offering, advising or sharing. For example: a newsletter may alert parents to additional “maths tutorials” offered before school, or “homework help sessions” after school. This reinforces again that the parent is interested in their student’s learning. It is equally important for parents to advise the school of extraneous issues happening at home, as this would give teachers an understanding of atypical behaviour, work ethic, concentration etc. An illness or death in the family (including a family pet), parent absence for more than a fortnight, or challenging issues on the home front, are examples of when parents should contact the school. Moderated assignments, extensions on homework, or relaxed detentions could result, and allow the student to resume their learning journey without additional stress. However secondary school students also need to gain skills and strategies to deal with life’s variables, and to become independent, confident problem solvers. So it’s also important for parents to give students opportunities to manage issues at school themselves. Parents should not approach the school to “fix” every minor problem, such as a student missing a page in an exam which lowered his grade, or a student feeling they had been maligned by a peer. Both these instances are life-lessons to learn from or solve, so parents should encourage students to approach teachers themselves when needed.

The strategies above should be developed with the child, and hopefully will be independently adopted by the student when they reach their final years at school. It’s worthwhile noting that each point is related to the child’s learning, as this sends a very positive message that the parent is engaged and interested in the learning process.

[OECD 2011] PISA in Focus, (2011). What can parents do to help their children succeed in school?. [online] Available at: http://www.oecd.org/pisa/49012097.pdf [Accessed 2 Jan. 2015].

[Henderson and Mapp 2002] Henderson, A. & Mapp, K. (2002). A new wave of evidence. The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement. Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL). Available: http://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/evidence.pdf [Accessed 2 Jan 2015]

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #60 – GAMING AND THE ADOLESCENT BRAIN

by psalter on January 2, 2015

What are electronic games doing to the adolescent brain?

Mobile and handheld technologies provide great opportunities for learning.  However, with the vast number of electronic games also available, it is easy for students to become distracted by these games at any hour of the day or night and in any location.  Globally, addiction to electronic games is becoming an increasing issue – with some players spending more than 12 hours a day playing games.

Here is some of the evidence about the negative impacts of too much gaming, including what is happening to the adolescent brain of students who spend too much time on these activities.

 

DA Gentile, H Choo, A Liau, T Sim, D Li, D Fung, A Khoo “Pathological Video Game Use Among Youths: A Two Year Longitudinal Study” (2011) Pediatrics Vol 127 No. 2, ppe319 – e329

This two year longitudinal study conducted in Singapore followed over 3,000 children in middle and high school.  It found that students who spent more time gaming had lower social confidence, greater impulsivity and were more likely to become pathological gamers. Further, the study found that those students who were pathological gamers were more likely to have lower school performance, along with disorders such as depression and anxiety.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/2/e319.short

 

J-P Chaput, T Visby, S Nyby, L Klingenberg, N Gregersen, A Tremblay, A Astrup & A Sjodin “Video Game Playing Increases Food Intake in Adolescents: A Randomised Crossover Study” (2011) The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Vol 93, no. 6 1196 – 1203

This study examined the relationship between energy intake and gaming in 22 adolescent males.  It compared their energy intake after a period of gaming and also a period of rest.  Biological markers (appetite hormones and blood pressure) were used as measures, along with behavioural observations (spontaneous food intake).  The study concluded that participants had a higher energy intake when engaging in gaming than during rest and that this was regardless of their appetite sensations. This means students were eating more than they needed.

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/93/6/1196.short

 

S-B Hong, A Zalesky, L Cocchi, A Fornito, E-J Choi, H-H Kim, J-W Kim and S-H Li (2013) “Decreased Functional Brain Connectivity in Adolescents with Internet Addiction” PLoS ONE 8(2): e57831. Doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0057831

In this study, the brains of 12 adolescents with a diagnosed internet addiction were examined in comparison with 11 “healthy” adolescents.  The study found that there was reduced functionality in parts of the brains of those with the addiction.

 

M-H Park, E-J Park, J Choi, S Chai, J-H Lee, C Lee, D-H Kim “Preliminary Study of Internet Addiction and Cognitive Function in Adolescents based on IQ Tests” Psychiatry Research Vol 190, Issues 2-3, 30 December 2011, pages 275-281

This study commenced with a screening of over 500 middle and high school students to identify those with an internet addiction and compared 59 internet addicted students to 43 non-addicted students using an IQ test.  Results showed that the students with an internet addiction had lower scores in relation to comprehension than the control group.  Further research is required to determine whether this is cause or effect ie. Does the lower comprehension predispose the student to internet addiction, or does the internet addiction cause brain changes?

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178111005786

 

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #59 – MAKING THE MOST OF THE YEARLY REPORT

by psalter on December 1, 2014

TIPS ON MAKING THE MOST OF THE END OF YEAR SCHOOL REPORT

1. Before the report arrives home, write your own school report. Make up a grid similar to this (below) for all subjects, and pretend to be the teacher and write about yourself. You could also create a grid that simulates your previous school report.

Subject Grade (A-E) Effort (A-E) Teacher’s comment
English
Maths

 

This gives you the opportunity to reflect on your own performance at school.

2. Read your report looking for positives. Most students will have find areas to commend.

3. The report should be viewed as a vehicle to move forward, and not be perceived as a final judgment of your ability – because it is not. It’s a “screenshot” and not the whole story. It is important to know you have the ability to modify and change your work ethic or study strategies, and that you can improve. The report is an opportunity to highlight strengths and weaknesses, and can help you develop goals for next year.

 4. Compare the yearly report to the Semester 1 report and last year’s report. This can be useful to identify specific subject areas where there has been an improvement or a decline.  If grades improved, celebrate this achievement. If the grades declined, think why this may be the case. For example, Semester 1 report grades may have been based on assignments and not exams. This could flag that exams were either not fully prepared for and study skills should be reviewed, or you need exam practice as they are a very different mode to demonstrate knowledge, or perhaps new concepts were introduced in Semester 2 and these could be weaknesses to work on!

 5. Don’t just look at grades, focus on effort also. Your performance is not measured solely by grades. Not every student will receive an A or B, in fact the average student would mostly like achieve a C grade (which typically represents the middle 60%). Effort grades however can reflect the teacher’s perspective on how hard you worked, your commitment to fulfill homework, assignments and contribution in class. A student who achieved a C grade, or 55%, yet gained an A for effort should be congratulated. Again, as the report should be viewed as a discussion and evaluation, if the effort grade is lower, think why this might be the case, and make a note of this to form one of the goals for next year.

6. Consider the “year average” mark or grade. Many schools will include the year average grade as well as your grade. This is important to consider. If you attained a 75%, and the year average was 62%, then you are well above the average. Celebrate this.  It’s also important to consider the academic strength of the school. If it is a selective high school, or a school where HSC results are consistently high, the year average would be considerably higher than the State average. For example, if you are at a school where 50% of the Year 12 students achieved an ATAR of 90 or over, and you are in the top half of the average, this needs to be considered, even if you achieved a 70%.

7. Teachers’ comments. Obviously if there is a consistent thread from multiple teachers, this needs to be addressed. For example, if many teachers comment on your lack of concentration, or need to focus on answering the question, then the comments suggest a specific area of weakness.

8. Grades varying between subjects, and compare exam results with assessment results. Identify specific subjects where grades were ‘low’ and where others were ‘high’. It is not uncommon for students to have strengths in some subjects and weaknesses in others. Few people excel across all subject areas, particularly in Years 7 – 10 when they have not yet been able to refine their academic program to areas of interest or strength. If grades vary, what are the reasons? It could be simply that you did not study for a subject at all, or had misread a heavily weighted question. Similarly compare exam grades against assessment grades. If your exam marks are noticeably less than the assessment grades, it could easily identify a weakness in exam technique and/or revision, and not be a reflection of ability or understanding. Remember, examinations are just one medium for determining knowledge.

 9. Establish goals for next year and consider a holiday review program (even if only 1 hour a week). The report can, and should, be read as an instrument to create goals for next year, and possibly plan a holiday review program. As students in December typically focus on the long summer holidays, freedom and unstructured days, it’s natural for school work to wane. However, now is the time to create goals for next year, whilst the academic year remains in your recent memory. It is more difficult to establish goals in February. Identify 3 – 5 goals for next semester. Some goals could be:

  • Focus on reading the question in assignments/exams carefully to ensure the question is answered.
  • Ensure I make summary notes when I finish each topic.
  • Do at least 30 minutes reviewing what I learned at school each day, in addition to homework.
  • Ask the teacher if I don’t understand a concept.
  • For example, if Maths is a weakness, spend 1 hour a week doing extra Maths practice. When the goals are listed put them in a prominent place – fridge, bedroom wall, notice board etc. It would also be prudent to develop a holiday review program if there are specific subjects or areas of subjects that are weak. This does not need to be extensive, in fact, shouldn’t, however regular practice of specific subjects that will be required for cumulative learning next year can make an enormous difference.  

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #58 – MANAGING TECHNOLOGY USE

by psalter on November 1, 2014

Top 10 Tips for Students for Managing Technology Distractions:

  1. Allocate specific times for work and for technology– this can be tricky given that much of the time students need to use technology for research.  However, making a timetable which clearly identifies time for homework/study, games and other online activities, means you know that you will soon get an opportunity to get back online.  It’s best to make these blocks in the time when you aren’t at your most “productive” with work.
  2. Turn off your technology distractions – turn off as many things as you can eg. phone, ipad, ipod, Facebook, Instagram, even your computer if you don’t need it for that piece of work.  If you aren’t aware of messages or notifications coming in, then you won’t need to check them.  Try it for half an hour and then get back to your messages once you’ve finished that work block.
  3. Set clear goals – once you have achieved your work goal, reward yourself with technology. Allow yourself 20 minutes of guilt free online time.
  4. Set a timer – if you can’t stop gaming or checking facebook, even when your allocated time is up, set an annoying timer….which you place away from where you are playing, so that you have to get up to turn off.  Once it’s off, you have already broken the connection to the game and it should be easier to get on with your work.
  5. Install software on your computer to help manage distractions – there are lots of different packages available to assist you in controlling your computer use – how long you use particular programs for and what you use.  More information is available for subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au in the Managing Distractions Unit of the Study Skills Handbook http://www.studyskillshandbook.com.au/inside/inside_content/home5c.html

  6. Don’t make in-App purchases – lots of us have downloaded a “free” app only to get caught up in the cycle of “in app” purchases so we can just get one more level or win.  Making a deal with yourself to wait for a while to have another go at a game both saves money and gives you 20-30 minutes to focus on schoolwork instead.
  7. Remember TV is technology too – working in front of the TV can be just as distracting as other forms of technology.  Save up your easy work – like title pages, or filing, to do in front of the TV and use your technology free time to focus on more challenging work.
  8. Enlist some help – ask your parent or sibling to help you manage your technology distractions by sitting near you while you work to monitor what you are doing, testing you on your current topics or holding on to your devices for you.
  9. Find a different place to work – some work can be done outside, or while you are exercising.  Why not step outside to review your study notes, or read your novel?  Record your notes or listen to a podcast when you are out walking the dog?
  10.  Do some mental skills development – if you really need to improve your focus, attention and memory, try doing some specific exercises.  http://www.cogmed.com.au/schools offers a formal school based program.  Also  http://www.lumosity.com/ http://www.mindgames.com/brain-games.php

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #57 – HOW TO STAY POSITIVE AS EXAMS APPROACH

by psalter on October 1, 2014

This month’s tip from Rocky Biasi at Human Connections.  Learn more about ‘tapping’ techniques that can help manage stress at: https://xb145.isrefer.com/go/entap/Enhanced/

SYDNEY ONLY: Individuals (parents and students) may be interested in attending a workshop in Sydney during October run by Karen Gilles on enhancing self-awareness and self-understanding, which will also help stress management: http://www.embodiedgroundedconnection.com/Workshops.html. Watch this YT video for more info:  http://youtu.be/U1OsiSnrLwE

If you listen to our podcast, Braintree Podcast, we’d love you to take this short survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/XHX72SN

 

Recently a student sent this email: Hi I was wondering if you could do a tip on staying positive when you are stressed and feeling depressed as our exams are coming up and I have been feeling depressed lately and I think it would help.

It can be difficult to stay positive or “be up” as exams approach. The more important the exam the more stress we can feel. Worse, if we don’t do anything to make us feel good, stress can lead to anxiety and depression. There are many reasons why students feel this stress and depressed mood as examination dates approach.

  • Students receive distorted messages and perceptions about the importance of the exams, such as, “this can/will determine your future” etc.
  • With the pressure and stress of exams students avoid doing the work necessary to be prepared and as a result feel more overwhelmed, hopeless, anxious etc. Students can feel they have no control of their situation.
  • When we allow the pressure, stress and upset to build we can get into bad habits and let go of good habits. As a result students can feel more drained and exhausted and find it difficult or impossible to “climb out of the dark hole” they are in.

A holistic approach to boost wellbeing as exams approach 

The key to being positive and managing negative emotions such as anxiety and feeling down and depressed in any pressure situation including exams is to “fuel up”. It goes without saying that if students are exhausted, tired, stressed, depressed etc. it is very difficult if not impossible to deal with the pressure of exams. “Fuelling Up” is about boosting wellbeing factors in students’ lives. Students need to boost the wellbeing factors in their BODY, MIND and EMOTIONS.

Trying to “feel good” or be “positive” when the body is exhausted and depleted is impossible! This is something we all know yet many of us find it difficult to change.

 

TIPS FOR WELLBEING

Here are some things you can do to boost the energy in your BODY:

  • See a doctor.

Visit your doctor and get a check up. It’s important that any medical issues are ruled out because you may try some of the following tips without noticing any benefit while all along there may have been a medical issue that needed attention.

  • Get better sleep.

Feeling good starts with getting the right amount and type of sleep. Start with a good night-time routine. Stop anything that stimulates you such as caffeine or TV or computer, iPad or phone screens etc. for an hour before you go to bed. Try a warm drink such as chamomile tea and use essential oils such as lavender oil. Having a soothing bath or shower can also help along with gentle stretching of tight or tense muscles. If you still feel you are not getting a “good” sleep be sure to see your doctor.

  • Eat in Moderation

Never skip a meal, especially breakfast. Breakfast replenishes your body and helps you start your day full of energy. Eat three main meals, and two to three snack meals a day. Eating five to six times in a day keeps your blood sugar levels balanced, giving you an overall sense of well-being needed for focusing on your tasks and responsibilities.

  • Exercise Regularly

Regular exercise, at least three times per week for a minimum of 30 minute sessions, can virtually “soak up” stress chemicals in your body and help you to relax and even sleep better. Brisk walking, aerobic classes, swimming, bike riding, or jogging are great exercises to release stress buildup and relax your body and mind to either start or end your day right.

 

Here are some things you can do to THINK more positively: 

  • Change your thinking and perceptions

Write down your top 5 fears and worries. What’s the worst thing that can happen? Then ask yourself, “IS THAT TRUE”? Usually fears and worries are not based on reality but on imagined scenarios that have little to no evidence. If it’s something that can’t be changed bring acceptance to it. It is what it is for now!

  • Change your focus

Have you noticed that what we worry about we make bigger and keep closer to us by the way we think and focus. Try this…make your fears and worries SMALL in size (5 cm in height) DARK in brightness and as far away as possible in DISTANCE. When we change the size, brightness and distance of the things that upset us in our minds it reduces the intensity of the emotion.

 

Here are some things you can do to FEEL more positive:

  • Acts of kindness

Make a list of 5 acts of kindness you can do every day. Make them simple acts of kindness that are easy to do such as saying thank you etc. Do these 5 acts of kindness every day for 6 weeks. The research shows that people that do this and think of 3 good things in their life (as above) have a dramatic positive boost in their mood.

good day 1 col

  • 3 good things exercise

Every day at the start and end of your day think of 3 good things that happened. Write them down. Then think about either WHY those good things happened or how it MADE YOU FEEL when those good things happened.

 

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #57 – HOW TO STAY POSITIVE AS EXAMS APPROACH

by psalter on October 1, 2014

Recently a student sent this email: Hi I was wondering if you could do a tip on staying positive when you are stressed and feeling depressed as our exams are coming up and I have been feeling depressed lately and I think it would help.

It can be difficult to stay positive or “be up” as exams approach. The more important the exam the more stress we can feel. Worse, if we don’t do anything to make us feel good, stress can lead to anxiety and depression. There are many reasons why students feel this stress and depressed mood as examination dates approach.

  • Students receive distorted messages and perceptions about the importance of the exams, such as, “this can/will determine your future” etc.
  • With the pressure and stress of exams students avoid doing the work necessary to be prepared and as a result feel more overwhelmed, hopeless, anxious etc. Students can feel they have no control of their situation.
  • When we allow the pressure, stress and upset to build we can get into bad habits and let go of good habits. As a result students can feel more drained and exhausted and find it difficult or impossible to “climb out of the dark hole” they are in.

A holistic approach to boost wellbeing as exams approach 

The key to being positive and managing negative emotions such as anxiety and feeling down and depressed in any pressure situation including exams is to “fuel up”. It goes without saying that if students are exhausted, tired, stressed, depressed etc. it is very difficult if not impossible to deal with the pressure of exams. “Fuelling Up” is about boosting wellbeing factors in students’ life. Students need to boost the wellbeing factors in their BODY, MIND and EMOTIONS.

Trying to “feel good” or be “positive” when the body is exhausted and depleted is impossible! This is something we all know yet many of us find it difficult to change.

 

TIPS FOR WELLBEING

Here are some things you can do to boost the energy in your BODY:

  • See a doctor.

Visit your doctor and get a check up. It’s important that any medical issues are ruled out because you may try some of the following tips without noticing any benefit while all along there may have been a medical issue that needed attention.

  • Get better sleep.

Feeling good all starts with getting the right amount and type of sleep. Start with a good night – time routine. Stop anything that stimulates you such as caffeine or TV or computer, iPad or phone screens etc. Try a warm drink such as chamomile tea and use essential oils such as lavender oil. Having a soothing bath or shower can also help along with gentle stretching of tight or tense muscles. If you still feel you are not getting a “good” sleep be sure to see your doctor.

  • Eat in Moderation

Never skip a meal, especially breakfast. Breakfast replenishes your body and helps you start your day full of energy. Eat three main meals, and two to three snack meals a day. Eating five to six times in a day keeps your blood sugar levels balanced, giving you an overall sense of well-being needed for focusing on your tasks and responsibilities.

  • Exercise Regularly

Regular exercise, at least three times per week for a minimum of 30 minute sessions, can virtually “soak up” stress chemicals in your body and help you to relax and even sleep better. Brisk walking, aerobic classes, swimming, bike riding, or jogging are great exercises to release stress buildup and relax your body and mind to either start or end your day right.

 

Here are some things you can do to THINK more positively: 

  • Change your thinking and perceptions

Write down your top 5 fears and worries. What’s the worst thing that can happen? Then ask yourself, “IS THAT TRUE”? Usually fears and worries are not based on reality but on imagined scenarios that have little to no evidence. If it’s something that can’t be changed bring acceptance to it. It is what it is for now!

  • Change your focus

Have you noticed that what we worry about we make bigger and keep closer to us by the way we think and focus. Try this…make your fears and worries SMALL in size (5 cm in height) DARK in brightness and as far away as possible in DISTANCE. When we change the size, brightness and distance of the things that upset us in our minds it reduces the intensity of the emotion.

 

Here are some things you can do to FEEL more positive:

  • Acts of kindness

Make a list of 5 acts of kindness you can do every day. Make them simple acts of kindness that are easy to do such as saying thank you etc. Do these 5 acts of kindness every day for 6 weeks. The research shows that people that do this and think of 3 good things in their life (as above) have a dramatic positive boost in their mood.

  • 3 good things exercise

Every day at the start and end of your day think of 3 good things that happened. Write them down. Then think about either WHY those good things happened or how it MADE YOU FEEL when those good things happened.

 

This month’s tip from Rocky Biasi at Human Connections. Learn more about techniques that can help manage stress at: https://xb145.isrefer.com/go/entap/Enhanced/

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #56 – MULTI-TASKING RESEARCH

by psalter on August 31, 2014

Even though parents and teachers tell students that multi-tasking is not an effective way to work, sometimes students just don’t believe them! They think they are different, they think it is just something parents and teachers say with no evidence. So here are some academic research studies to demonstrate to students where the proof is coming from to show that multi-tasking personal activities and schoolwork just doesn’t work.

RESEARCH STUDY 1
Ellis, Y., Daniels, W. and Jauregui, A. (2010). The effect of multitasking on the grade performance of business students. Research in Higher Education Journal, 8 http://www.aabri.com/manuscripts/10498.pdf
In this study, 62 university students were taking an accounting course. During a lecture, half were allowed to text and half had their phones turned off. After the lecture there was a quiz and those students who did not text scored much higher marks than those who were texting at the same time that they were trying to listen to the lecture.

stayingfocusedRESEARCH STUDY 2
Kraushaar, J. M. and Novak, D. C. (2010). Examining the affects of student multitasking with laptops during lecture. Journal of Information Systems Education, 21 (2), 241-251.
In this study 97 students were using laptops during a 15 week management information systems course. A spyware program had been installed on all laptops to track what students did on their laptop looking at productive work versus distractive software (games, instant messages, web browsing, social media). Students who tried to listen to the lecture while using these distractive windows had significantly lower scores on homework, projects, quizzes, final exams and final course averages. The researchers also found that students under reported the extent of their multi-tasking – this means they were actually multi-tasking much more than they even realised.

RESEARCH STUDY 3
Bowman, L. L., Levine, L. E., Waite, B. M. and Dendron, M. (2010). Can students really multitask? An experimental study of instant messaging while reading. Computers & Education, 54, 927-931.
Students in a psychology course had to read on their computer screen a 4000 word document. There were 3 groups. One used instant messaging before they started reading, one used instant messaging while they were reading, and a third group just read the document with no instant messaging. The group who did instant messaging while they were reading took between 22% to 59% longer to read the passage – and that was with the time spent messaging subtracted!

RESEARCH STUDY 4
Fried, C. B. (2008). In-class laptop use and its effects on student learning. Computers and Education, 50 (3), 906-914.
Students in a psychology course completed weekly surveys on their use of laptops during class. The study found that the more students used their laptops in class the lower was their performance and their understanding of the lectures.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #55 – WHERE TO FIND HELP

by psalter on August 1, 2014

personal issuesWhere can you find help when you are struggling at school?

PERSONAL ISSUES

If things in your life are upsetting you or stressing you this will affect your ability to learn effectively. Talk to your family, talk to your friends or other people you are close to or teachers you feel comfortable sharing with. However if you need additional support, make sure you find it rather than let things get worse. You can approach the counsellor at your school and they can give you some professional help or find someone who can help you with your specific problems. If you want someone to talk to, you can use Kids Helpline, a free confidential service: 1800 55 1800 or use the online service at www.kidshelp.com.au. It is much better to talk to someone rather than lock it all inside you.

 

SUBJECT SPECIFICsubjectspecific ISSUES

If you are finding a particular subject difficult, the first place you should seek help should be your classroom teacher.  Firstly ask questions in class as problems arise. If you find you have too many questions to ask in class (as you’d end up disturbing the class) then ask your teacher if you can make a time to see them before or after class or during lunch or after school. Teachers are happy to help students who do their best and are keen to improve. Other places you might be able to find help are: books or extra textbooks in the school or local library, other students in the class, students in older years, other teachers at the school, family members, family friends. If you try all of these options and are still having problems, then you might consider looking for a tutor. Often ex-students from your school who are at university might be interested in doing some tutoring or even teachers at other schools. You can ask your teacher if they can recommend anyone.

 

LEARNING ISSUESlearning issues

If you aren’t having trouble with a specific subject, but are finding learning for school in general difficult, the first people to talk to are your parents. You might like to write down your feelings or what you are experiencing so you can explain things to them clearly. Your parents can then help you decide what steps to take next. It is probably a good idea for them to talk to your teachers first to get their perspectives. They might make an appointment with one of the pastoral care staff like a Year Coordinator to sit down with you and your parents to talk through the issues you are experiencing.  The school might also have learning support staff who can help you work out what your issues are and who the best people are to help you.  If the learning support staff can’t help you, they will be able to refer you to outside services who can diagnose and address any learning issues you might have.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #54 – MANAGING STRESS & RELAXING

by psalter on July 1, 2014

stressaSeven Quick Tips to Help you Relax

The daily demands of life, such as exams, peer pressure, and homework assignments, or the challenges of relationships, family, or not making it on a sporting team can lead to an overwhelming feeling of stress. What you need to learn is how to cope with these situations in order to live a successful, productive, and happy life. Here are some proven techniques to help you relax and eliminate stress from your mind and body.

 

1. Eat in Moderation
Never skip a meal, especially breakfast. Breakfast replenishes your body and helps you start your day full of energy. Eat three main meals, and two to three snack meals a day. Eating five to six times in a day keeps your blood sugar levels balanced, giving you an overall sense of well-being needed for focusing on your tasks and responsibilities.

2. Exercise Regularly
Regular exercise, at least three times per week for a minimum of 30 minute sessions, can virtually “soak up” stress chemicals in your body and help you to relax and even sleep better. Brisk walking, aerobic classes, swimming, bike riding, or jogging are great exercises to release stress build up and relax your body and mind to either start or end your day right.

3. Remember to Breathe
When you feel your body start to tense, especially in your shoulders, chest, and abdomen when faced with a stressful situation, stop and take a few deep, slow breaths. If you are entering into a stressful situation, breathe slowly and evenly, using diaphragmatic breathing. This is a technique where you focus your breathing on your diaphragm where your belly rises and falls with each breath. Diaphragmatic breathing allows you to calm your nerves and relax your body and mind as your attention is placed on your breath.

4. Take a Time Out and be MINDFUL
As you go through your day, take little breaks, about two to five minutes, to relax and unwind. Whether it’s sitting quietly, listening to relaxing music, or meditation, take a moment to place yourself in your own calm state.

5. Pursue an Interest
Find something that you enjoy doing that is relaxing for you. When you find an interest that matches your personality, you can not only unwind and release stress, but engage your creativity in expressing yourself. This could be through painting, playing basketball, writing, playing a musical instrument, or signing up for a class that you have always been wanting to take.

6. Have a Support Network
Create a support network of close friends or family that you can turn to in times of stress. Good and loving relationships are key for your well-being and happiness. It makes you realize what is important in life and where your energies should be placed.

7. Avoid Bad Habits
When you are under stress, it is easy to turn to your established bad habits to deal with the stress. These habits are negative and will not take away stress, but only prolong it. The best way to avoid bad habits is to create new positive habits. Here is how to create a positive habit:
• Decide on the habit. Will you go for a walk each morning, go to the gym, take time out to do something special for yourself?
• Decide on where and when you will do this new habit. Choose a time and place and continue this new activity for 3 months (it takes around 66 days to establish a habit).
• Reward yourself each time you do this new activity. You may simply take a moment to notice how good it feels.

These tips provided by Rocky Biasi from Human Connections (www.humanconnections.com.au) a secondary high school teacher and school counsellor currently in private practice. Rocky is a specialist in the field of peak performance and wellbeing. He has created a number of programs including his online wellbeing resource: http://hcsmc.com/dl

MANAGING STRESS AND ANXIETY RESOURCE: Rocky Biasi and I have presented joint sessions to thousands of students since 2006 and I have personally experienced and witnessed how the Tapping Technique he teaches helps students relax and calm down in minutes. He has created a resource so you can learn more about it. You can find out more and access it here https://xb145.isrefer.com/go/entap/Enhanced/. He is asking only $7 and providing 100% of the proceeds to a fantastic school called Giant Steps. This school helps children and their families with Autism.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #53 – HAVING SET TIMES FOR SCHOOLWORK

by psalter on June 1, 2014

Many students when they come home from school end up just waiting until they might ‘feel’ like doing schoolwork. Or else they drag the work out over the whole night. A much better way to work is each night have set allocated times for schoolwork, 2-3 half hour blocks. During this time you should do homework first, then work on any assignments or upcoming tests, then use the rest of the time allocated for schoolwork to independent learning activities. All distractions should be removed during this time, so you learn to focus for 20-30 minute blocks of time.
genius
Some of the benefits for students of having set times allocated for schoolwork are:

  • You are more likely to do the work if you know when to start and when to end.
  • You will be more effective when you remove distractions and learn to focus for 20-30 minute blocks.
  • In all the times NOT allocated to schoolwork you can do whatever you like without feeling guilty about it.
  • Having set times stops arguments between students and parents as everyone has agreed when the timeslots allocated to students will be.
  • You know that you are definitely doing enough work for school.
  • Keeping schoolwork and personal life separate means you will be able to manage all of the distractions in your life and still complete your work for school.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP #52 – THINKING AHEAD

by psalter on May 1, 2014

Are you riding a rollercoaster at school? Rollercoaster study is where you stay up late doing last minute assignments, then you take it easy for a while and do very little, then panic again when something is due and have to spend huge amounts of time at the end completing the work. If you plan ahead and are prepared, you will find school much less stressful and more rewarding.

Here are the top tips for thinking ahead:

1. STUDY NOTES: If you know that you have a test at the end of each topic or examinations approaching, then on the nights you do not have much homework start working on your study notes and summaries. File them in folders at home so they are ready to go when you need them.

2. ASSIGNMENTS: Always start the assignment the day it is given to you, even if it is just a little bit. Make sure you understand the requirements and if you don’t ask your teacher straight away the next day. Brainstorm the steps the first night and do a rough plan of when you will do each step.

3. ASK FOR HELP EARLY: There is nothing more frustrating than a student who says ‘I haven’t understood anything we did in the last 3 weeks’. Ask for help as soon as you have a problem. Keep a list of questions for your teacher on a post-it in your textbook or sticky notes on your computer or a list in your phone. Don’t let problems or issues build up, ask for help early and often.

4. THINK ABOUT WHO YOU SIT NEXT TO: Choose wisely who you will sit with in class. This can make a world of difference to your results. If you sit with someone where it is a productive relationship, you encourage and help each other and stay on task in the classroom you will understand your work better and have less to do at home.

5. CONSIDER YOUR WEEK: Plan ahead for busy times. If you know you have nights where you can’t do much work or a busy weekend, plan ahead and get things done early. Always look ahead for possible times where you could be caught short of time and make plans to avoid problems.

rollercoaster1

Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au may also like to work through the STUDY NOTES, ASSIGNMENT SKILLS, ASKING FOR HELP, TIME MANGEMENT SKILLS, MANAGING WORKLOAD, DEALING WITH DISTRACTIONS and OVERCOMING PROCRASTINATION units. Check if your school subscribes here.


If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TOP TIP #51 – WHY DO WE HAVE TO HAVE HOMEWORK?

by psalter on March 31, 2014

Homework in secondary school serves many purposes. It could be to consolidate or check or extend the learning from the day or prepare for the learning to come in subsequent days. It could be to do with longer term work such as assignments or preparing for tests and examinations. Ultimately it comes back to what school is all about – learning. Learning not just content, but learning and developing skills. At times students feel that the work they are doing at school is not relevant to their lives, however sometimes we need to look beyond the content to the purpose of the learning exercise. At times the content will be a vehicle to teach particular skills. Much of what we learn in Mathematics develops the problem solving circuits in our brain. When you are analysing Shakespeare you are learning not just about Shakespeare but to think critically and expand your point of view and broaden your experience of the world through examination of different lives, emotions and experiences. The message is that everything you learn at school has purpose and value, even if you can’t quite see it at the time.

There is much debate in the media as to the value of homework. In Primary school it has been shown that only a small amount of students actually benefit from doing homework in terms of academic achievement. The exception to this is reading at home – every student benefits from this. However the other benefits can’t be discounted: developing independent working skills, establishing study routines necessary for learning in later years, helping students master things they are struggling with and allowing parental involvement. In secondary school homework has been proven to be an essential component of academic success in the senior years. The reality of Year 11 and 12 is that a large component of independent learning needs to be undertaken at home. One of the biggest problems for students transitioning to the senior years is that they have not learnt to work effectively and efficiently in the home environment. This is why developing good habits and learning to do at least a solid hour a day of home study is essential in Years 7-10. It is also about developing the qualities of discipline and perseverance, both essential for senior studies. Students will not like every subject equally, students need to learn how to make themselves do the work even for their least favourite subjects.

So what can you do to manage your homework effectively? Try these top tips:

  1. As soon as you get home unpack your bag before you have a break and something to eat. Lay out all the work first. It is easier to get started if you have everything ready to go.
  2. Before you start work, write a list of what needs to be done and decide what order you will do it. Focus on what is most important, not just what subject you like best!  Also write down how long you think each task will take to do.
  3. Keep in your mind that it is all about learning. Try and look beyond the actual content to what type of skill this homework might be developing in you – analysing, critical thinking, writing skills, or problem solving skills for example.
  4. Do your work in 20-30 minute blocks with no distractions during that time. So switch off the TV, turn off your phone for that 20-30 minutes. When you just focus on the work that needs to be done you’ll be amazed at how much work you complete. Of course if you are on a roll, you can keep going past the 30 minutes.
  5. If there is a task you really don’t want to do then alternate this with a task you enjoy doing. For example 15 minutes on the homework you like, 5 minutes on the homework you don’t like. When you chip away at it you will be surprised how quickly you get through the work.

Resize of homework

Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au may also like to work through the TIME MANGEMENT SKILLS, DEALING WITH DISTRACTIONS and OVERCOMING PROCRASTINATION units.

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP # 50 – 5 REASONS NOT TO PUT OFF STARTING ASSIGNMENTS

by psalter on March 1, 2014

Here are 5 reasons why you should start working on your assignment simmediately.

1. GET YOUR BRAIN THINKING ABOUT THE TOPIC:
Even if your assignment isn’t due for weeks, start thinking about it immediately. At the very least, answer the key starter questions on the day you get your assignment. Even if you are not thinking about it directly, your subconscious will be hard at work.

2. FIND LIBRARY RESOURCES:
Although the school or local library will probably not be your main source of reference, you should drop in soon after receiving the assignment. Your teacher will probably have alerted the school librarian to the assignment and reference books, magazines etc may well be displayed. These will disappear quickly if the whole class has the same assignment. Books, periodicals, magazines can sometimes be a useful general overview for an assignment and they help to clarify a direction as you begin to immerse yourself into the assignment topic. It is not a good idea to only use Google!

3. DISCOVER OTHER RESOURCES:
You could also ask your local librarian for any additional direction on where to look for resource material for your assignment. Librarians are often your best source of information. They know how to help people access relevant and appropriate information, in books, the Internet or computer based references. One of the challenging aspects of Internet based searches for school students is the complexity, language and purpose of websites, not to mention bias and reliability.

4. STARTING EARLY MEANS MORE TIME TO EXPLORE & ASK FOR HELP IF NEEDED: 
If you do some initial research on the assignment points you’ve identified through the library, references your teacher may have given you, school textbooks, and general internet search engines, you could find yourself having more direction in your research. For example: Perhaps there isn’t enough information, or perhaps you find you don’t understand important concepts, or perhaps you need to speak to your teacher to get further clarity. If you find this out early, you will still have plenty of time to plan, research, write and present your assignment. Imagine if you didn’t start your assignment for a week or so, and then discovered you needed more guidance. You could easily run out of time.

5. CREATE A SAFETY NET:
Starting your assignment immediately will give you a safety net in case you get sick, or something unexpected happens. Assignments usually require a large amount of time; students must plan a strategy or schedule to ensure they are completed. You should always have a schedule that allows for the unexpected.

So get started today!

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP 49 – SECONDARY SCHOOL SUCCESS

by psalter on January 31, 2014

Every parent and teacher would like to see students achieving their personal academic best at school. Knowing how to work efficiently can help students navigate the mire of academic demands in secondary school in a stress-free way. Here are the top five tips about making the most of your time at school this year and working efficiently at home.

1. INDEPENDENT LEARNING:
There are two types of work in secondary school. The compulsory work your teacher tells you to do, and independent learning that you are expected to do when you have no homework. (Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au – you can print a handout on the Things to Print page that will give you examples of the types of things you are supposed to be doing for school when you have no homework.)

2. WORK SMART:
If you want to still have a life, but get your schoolwork done (for most students this will be 1-2 hours per night) then you need to work smart. Keep your personal life and schoolwork separate. Don’t do work in front of the TV, switch off your phone and Facebook. Work in half hour blocks and focus only on your schoolwork during that half hour block. If you are super busy with lots of activities then a great idea is to draw up a timetable for the week and allocate time for schoolwork over the week. (Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au – you might like to visit these units on the site: Time Management Skills, Dealing with Distractions, Overcoming Procrastination.)

3. BE ORGANISED AND PLAN:
Being organised makes your life easier! So have an organised space to work in, record homework in your diary, keep track of completed work and reschedule work not done. When you are told about a test or an assignment, plan the work out to be done over the available time. Make the most of your time in class, being organised and focused in the classroom means you will find it easier to complete your work and work on big things like assessments at home. (Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au – you might like to check out these units on the site: Home Study Environment, Organisation and Filing, Managing Workload, Using Classtime.)

4. ASK FOR HELP EARLY:
If you don’t understand something, ask for help. The sooner the better. If there isn’t time in class see your teacher before or after class or during the break times. No-one expects you to do things on your own. One of the most important contributors to being successful academically is to ask for help often and early. See if your school offers extra support or has a homework help service. And don’t forget family and friends, they might know more than you think!

5. LEARN HOW TO STUDY PROPERLY:
If you still think that to study for a test you just read your book over and over, time to learn how smart people study!  The main things to remember about study for a test are: Make study notes or summaries first (write down in point form what you need to learn), learn these notes not just by reading but by testing yourself on them and do as many different questions as you can as practise. (Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au – you can learn more from these units: Summarising, Active Studying, Preparing for Exam Blocks, Test-Taking Techniques, Your Brain and Memory.)

 

 

 

NOTE: If you have just started secondary school (or know someone who has) you may be interested in this great new resource: HELP#1 – Starting Secondary School ($7). Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au can access this resource for free (go to the MORE menu then THINGS TO PRINT page). Check if your school subscribes here.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP 48 – TOP TIPS FOR A NEW YEAR

by psalter on January 1, 2014

This month’s post is a guest post from Skylar Anderson. Skylar Anderson is a Seminar Director at StudyRight. He graduated summa cum laude from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and is currently pursuing a Master’s Degree. He has been helping students simplify their studies and get the most from their education through StudyRight since 2011.

Three Top Tips to Encourage Students to Boost Their Academic Career in 2014

With the beginning of the new year, it’s always a great time to re-prioritize and re-vamp your academic approach. The key to making the most of this opportunity is focusing on the things which will bring the biggest return. Consider prioritizing these three tips to get the most from your education in 2014.

1. Simplify Your Organization System

Every student has an organization system. True, the definition of “organization” may be looser for some students than others, but everyone has a way they stay organized (or attempt to).

Maybe you’re the “Type-A” student and you have a clearly defined system. You’ll know that you’re “Type-A” by the file folders you both own and use, the folded socks in your drawer, and all the lists by which you keep track of important information. You probably have a calendar, a planner, and you know exactly which clothing is clean and which is dirty.

But not everyone fits in such a naturally organized world. These students can be called “Type-B.”

If you’re a “Type-B” student, you’re not alone, but organization probably requires more effort. “Type-B” students tend to prefer “piling systems” to filing cabinets. Calendars often seem like too much work, so they’d rather just put everything in their backpacks and find it later. Students on the far end of the “Type-B” universe may even find themselves sorting laundry via the “smell check” method.

Regardless of whether you are a Type A or B student, though, one of the biggest difference-makers this year is your organization system. Few things will save time and improve academic performance the way an effective organization system will.

A great organization system has at its centre one goal: replace your brain.

The more organized you are, the less you have to think. Your organization system should be simple enough that you don’t have to make any decisions about where you put new assignments, where to find completed assignments, or what to do with graded assignments. You shouldn’t have to go through a mental checklist every time you study because your organization system does it for you.

The fewer decisions you need to make, the more your thoughts and energy can focus on things that matter. Thus the simpler your system, the better. Consider these four questions to determine how simple your organization system is right now:

  • Do you have only one place for each category of assignments: not completed (“to-do”), completed (“to-turn-in”), and graded (“to-file”)?
  • Do you have only one place where you keep your notes for class?
  • Do you have a system to make sure that all assignments get on your calendar?
  • Do you have a system to focus on what needs to be done today and not just what’s due tomorrow?

When you can answer each of these four questions without thinking, you’ll know that your organization system is simple enough to be a major asset in 2014. If you find that you’re needing an organization overhaul, check out this YouTube video that teaches you how to construct your own affordable and simple organization system.

2. Break the “Cram Cycle” Before it Starts

By the end of the semester, students often find themselves overloaded and overwhelmed, having to rely on cramming for final exams to get through to the break. They are exhausted and in survival mode. Thriving academically no longer matters. All that matters is the break at the end.

If you’ve ever felt this way, you’ve experienced what we call the “Cram Cycle.” Students get busy during the semester, which leads to exhaustion. When you’re exhausted, the only thing you want to do is zone out for a bit. After an afternoon of zoning, students are forced to put all their effort into completing assignments that are due tomorrow. We call this “cramming.” As students work on only that which is due tomorrow, long-term assignments pile up and create even more busyness, which leads to exhaustion, and the “Cram Cycle” begins to accelerate.

Most students only get out of the “Cram Cycle” when the semester ends.

But 2014 can be different. If you want to stay out of this dreaded cycle, commit yourself to studying at least five days a week, even when you don’t have anything due the next day. Use every day as a review day, spreading out your study sessions for big tests and projects across multiple days instead of letting them pile up. This approach takes more effort initially to create these habits, but you’ll reap the benefits when you’re free of the “Cram Cycle” and the stress that follows it come finals season.

3. Supercharge Retention with Scientifically-verified Study Strategies

Everyone knows that taking notes is a good idea. Reading your textbooks seem like a great thing to do. And you’ve probably learned that it’s best to have a consistent place to study, one which is quiet, clean, and comfortable enough (but not TOO comfortable).

But one of the best things you can do in 2014 is focus your efforts on strategies that have been scientifically-verified to boost your retention.

For example, one of the best things you can do is to take a break in the middle of your study sessions. In one study psychologists wanted to find out whether there was any difference in “spacing” a study session (this means to take a break in the middle) or “massing” instead (which means that you hammer it out all at once).

The researchers took two randomly-chosen, equal groups of students, gave them the same amount of study time, gave them the same material, and tested them on the material afterward. The only difference was that one group took a short break in the middle and the other group didn’t. The results were incredible.

The group that studied with “spacing” did 50% better than the group that studied with “massing.” That means in the same amount of study time, you could potentially boost your retention by 50% by just taking a ten-minute break.

If you’d like to learn more scientifically-verified strategies that will save you time and boost your retention for 2014, get your free copy of StudyRight’s e-book, “Cracking the Student Success Code: 8 Study Strategies Proven by Psychologists to Increase Retention and Save Time.” Psychologists have done the hard work of finding out the best study strategies for you already. Make use of them in 2014 to enhance your academic career in a new way.

This month’s post is a guest post from Skylar Anderson. Skylar Anderson is a Seminar Director at StudyRight. He graduated summa cum laude from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and is currently pursuing a Master’s Degree. He has been helping students simplify their studies and get the most from their education through StudyRight since 2011.

 

 

NOTE: If you have just started secondary school (or know someone who has) you may be interested in this great new resource: HELP#1 – Starting Secondary School ($7). Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au can access this resource for free (go to the MORE menu then THINGS TO PRINT page). Check if your school subscribes here.

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP 47 – SWOT ANALYSIS

by psalter on December 1, 2013

Reflecting on Triumphs and Tribulations

With the end of the year fast approaching it is a good time for students to reflect on their approach to school this year.  If you wait until next year you will have forgotten what you did this year and what you need to change for next year. So as the holidays approach, take a moment to do a short SWOT analysis on your personal approach to school and learning. Students may like to discuss these questions with a teacher, parent or friend.

STRENGTHS:

  • What did you do well at school this year?
  • What subjects or topics were you good at?
  • What worked for you in your approach to learning?
  • What are you proud of achieving?
  • What new skills did you develop?

WEAKNESSES:

  • What were your greatest challenges in achieving your personal best at school?
  • What did you find difficult this year?
  • What skills do you feel needed more work?
  • What areas of your approach did you struggle with?
  • When did you feel not confident about your ability to succeed?

OPPORTUNITIES:

  • What could you do to build your strengths and deal with your weaknesses?
  • Who did you encounter this year that might be able to help you on this journey?
  • What will be different about next year that will create opportunities to change?
  • What could you personally do differently in your approach to school next year?
  • What one thing could you change that would make the biggest difference to you being a more effective learner?

THREATS:

  • What are the biggest obstacles to you making changes in your approach?
  • Are there other students you sit with who make learning difficult?
  • What is stopping you from achieving the top marks you are capable of achieving?
  • What challenges do you face in staying motivated to do your work for school?
  • What challenges do you face in managing distractions and procrastination?

In these school holidays it is important for students to have a decent break , recharge and spend time with friends and family doing things they enjoy. Certainly if students are weak in areas such as literacy or numeracy, some practice on a regular basis over the holidays would not go astray. There are many apps listed on the study skills handbook site that are useful (android apps now available too!) and bookshops and libraries also have workbooks. It is essential however that Year 11 students spend some time these school holidays consolidating the work from Year 11, ensuring study notes are up to date and they are organised and prepared for the challenges ahead in Year 12.

 


Students whose school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au should go to the Things to Print page. There are two handouts you will find useful for this exercise: ‘Set Your Targets’ and ‘SWOT Analysis’. You can check if your school subscribes here: http://www.enhanced-learning.net/eles_studyskillsforschools/eles_studyskillshandbook/sshwhatschools.php

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP 46 – HOW TO STUDY

by psalter on November 1, 2013

A common form of assessment in secondary school is a test or examination. Unfortunately many students don’t really know how to study properly for a test. They just read their notes over and over and hope that the content will stay in their head. This is the slowest and most ineffective way of studying. Some students manage to get through on natural ability for awhile, but in the end it is necessary to learn how to study effectively so students can achieve their personal best in an as efficient manner as possible.

So here’s how you study for a test.

> Make study notes.
> Learn the notes by testing yourself on them.
> Do lots of questions as practice.

 

Here’s the longer version of how to approach your study for a test:

1. FIND OUT EVERYTHING YOU CAN
Find out everything you can about the test. What topics are being tested, what types of questions there will be (multiple choice, short answer), how long the test will be, how marks are allocated.

2. ASK IF UNSURE
If you are not sure what you need to study or how to study make sure you ask your teacher until you are clear. If the opportunity arises, then ask in class, otherwise ask your teacher if you can see them before or after class sometime. If you are still not clear, ask your parents to give your teacher a call to clarify things.

3. MAKE SOME STUDY NOTES/SUMMARIES
As you begin to study for a test or exam one of the first things you need to do is to make some study notes or summaries.

The reasons we make study notes/summaries are:
• When you just read through things they don’t stay in your head very well. Even if you read through them over and over this is a very inefficient way of studying.
• By thinking about what is important and how you can write it down in a condensed form the info starts to move into your memory.
• This also helps you ensure you understand what you need to learn. When you start trying to reduce information to the key points you will quickly discover when you don’t understand something.
• Sometimes the information will be spread out over many many pages in your textbook and also be spread across a number of different places like sheets and exercise books or computers.
Making summaries allows us to reduce the amount of pages we have to keep reading over by bringing everything we need to learn together in one place in an organised and easier to learn way.

4. ASK FOR HELP
If you came across things you did not understand or were not sure of when making your notes ask your teacher or parents for help. You may also like to show your teacher and parents the notes you have made to get some feedback from them about what you could do to improve.

5. LEARN THE NOTES
The next stage is to start getting the information into your memory. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes. Don’t just read the notes.
Do you get what we are saying here???? The biggest mistake students make is they think study is just reading things over and over until hopefully some of it sticks in their head.
The right way to study involves extra steps after reading. What you do is read a section of your notes then TEST YOURSELF on what you have just read.

You could test yourself in the following ways:
• Seeing what you can write down without looking at the notes and then checking to see which bits you got wrong.
• Seeing what you can say out loud without looking at the notes and then checking to see which bits you got wrong.
• Getting someone to test you.
• Making flashcards on things you need to learn in your notes and testing yourself on these.
• Writing a list of questions as you read your notes then seeing if you can answer them after you finish reading.
• Remember this great technique: look, say, cover, write, check!

6. REPEAT STEP 5 OVER AND OVER AND OVER
Repetition is the key to remembering things. So test yourself over and over and over on your notes until you find that you are starting to remember the information easily. This is why it is a good idea to start early and spread your study out over all the time before the test.

7. DO LOTS OF PRACTICE
This means you need to do as many different questions as possible to see if you can apply what you have learnt to different types of questions.
Ways you can practise:
• Your teacher may give you a revision sheet or a past examination paper to do.
• You could go back in your textbook and pick out questions to re-do, particularly ones you found hard.
• Your school library may have another textbook in a different brand or a study guide for that subject and you can do the questions in that book.
• You can re-do any exercises or activities you did during the topic.
• Some schools will put extra revision activities up on the school website for you to download.
• Some textbooks come with a CD with extra questions or a supporting website with extra questions.
• If you feel you have nothing to practise from (ie no questions to do to see if you understand the work) ask your teacher, or even ask your parent to buy you a book you could use to do questions from – most of the big bookshops will have an educational section.

8. ASK FOR HELP
Throughout this whole process, anytime there is something you don’t understand you must ask for help. Don’t ignore any problems, or let them build up, see your teacher and ask about them as quickly as possible.

 

 

Students whose school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au should work through the following units: Summarising, Active Studying, Test-Taking Techniques. You can check if your school subscribes here: http://www.enhanced-learning.net/eles_studyskillsforschools/eles_studyskillshandbook/sshwhatschools.php

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net

 


STUDY SKILLS TIP 45 – PERFECTIONISM

by psalter on October 1, 2013

Expectations on students can create a very competitive environment. Students are inundated with information about the significance of academic performance, and the result, in many cases, is that some students develop unhealthy propensities for perfectionism.

Perfectionism may not sound like much of a problem in an academic atmosphere – after all, teachers and parents want students to develop strong work ethics and sound study habits. The problem is, true perfectionism actually tends to lead students away from these healthy developments. When a student becomes upset over a score of 98 out of 100, or can’t handle coming in 2nd out of a class of 30, or spend hours on something that should take 10 minutes…..then study and stress levels will often suffer as a result.

Perfectionism to this degree usually results from a fear of failure, rejection or disapproval, or insecurity about meeting a given standard. Students feeling these pressures quickly fall into inefficient work patterns, focusing on proving themselves, rather than on doing individual assignments effectively. So – how can such patterns and thought processes be avoided? You may like to read these specific suggestions for coping with perfectionism and use the tips below.

1. SEPARATE WORK FROM PERSONAL FEELINGS:
This is a huge hurdle for many students. The fact is, an evaluation of your work often feels like an evaluation of you personally, and the pressure of making that evaluation positive can lead to perfectionism. Students must learn to treat work evaluation as feedback for their learning, not as a personal reflection on themselves.

2. SET INCREMENTAL GOALS:
Many students tend to set unattainable, or at least extremely difficult goals. Instead, students should focus on setting goals based on past achievements and efforts. If a student gets an 85 on an exam, the goal for the next one should not be 100 – it should be an 87. If they study for only twenty minutes for a test, next time aim for thirty. Incremental goals are more reasonable, and most long-term improvement occurs gradually.

3. RECOGNISE STRESS:
This can be easier said than done, but it’s crucial in battling perfectionism. Students need to be aware of the fact when they’re stressing over a project (spending extra unnecessary hours, re-writing pages exhaustively, etc.). Learning to recognize stress can help students to reevaluate work methods and stop and think how much effort is appropriate for that task.

4. EXPLORE EFFICIENT WORK METHODS:
Often, newer or easier work methods can assist in efficiency. Students shouldn’t get lazy, but should allow certain technologies to make work easier. That might mean downloading Evernote for easy electronic note-taking, or it may mean organising cloud storage and computer organization – whatever the case, perfectionists can often find their workloads lessened by these steps.

5. PUT THINGS IN PERSPECTIVE:
It’s incredibly important for students to have proper perspective on schoolwork. Being able to stop and think about the worst case scenario can help students to realize that an individual assignment – while important – should not be a source of unnecessary stress or excessive workload.

Ultimately, dealing with perfectionism can be a long and tricky process. But implementing these habits and thought processes can help students to develop a healthier approach to their schoolwork.

Note: Subscribers to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au may like to visit the Things to Print page to print a student and parent/teacher handout on Perfectionism and a handout on Fixed vs Growth Mindset.

 

 

If your school subscribes to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au you can learn more about how students can achieve their personal best at school by working through the units on the site. Check if your school subscribes here. This tip is also emailed to the main contact teachers for the subscribing schools to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au to use in their school newsletters.

NOTE: The CONTENT on this blog is NOT TO BE COPIED, reproduced or shared in any form.

The only exception to this are the SUBSCRIBING SCHOOLS to www.studyskillshandbook.com.au who have permission to use these tips in their school newsletters, forward to students and parents or post on school noticeboards.

 

Dr Prue Salter
Enhanced Learning Educational Services
The study skills specialist!
Study Skills Resources: www.enhanced-learning.net